Unhappy Girl, by The Doors

Dorothea Lange - Resettled farm child from Taos Junction to Bosque Farms project
Dorothea Lange – Resettled farm child from Taos Junction to Bosque Farms project, New Mexico. Photograph for the Farm Security Administration (December 1935) – from Wikimedia Commons

I have recently presented “You’re Lost Little Girl,” the second track of the album Strange Days by The Doors, and I said that this song probably refers to William Blake’s poem “A Little Girl Lost” in Songs of Experience (1794). Commenting the repeated line “You’re lost little girl” in the song’s lyrics, Genius says about Blake’s poem “A Little Girl Lost:” CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

You’re Lost Little Girl, by The Doors

Paul Stewart - Tracy Stratford in The Twilight Zone, Episode 91: Little Girl Lost (1962)
Paul Stewart – Tracy Stratford in The Twilight Zone, Episode 91: Little Girl Lost (1962)

The Doors released their second album Strange Days in September 1967. Many fans consider it as the band’s most original and creative album. Its second track is a song called “You’re Lost Little Girl,” about a little girl who is lost, but knows what to do. For this song, the singer Jim Morrison was requested to relax, not to shout, so that his voice would sound like that of Frank Sinatra. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

Alabama Song

Jim Morrison with a little girl
Jim Morrison with a little girl

The poem “Alabama Song” (also known as “Moon of Alabama,” “Moon over Alabama,” or “Whisky Bar”) was first written in German by Bertolt Brecht, then translated into English by Elisabeth Hauptmann in 1925. Kurt Weill set it to music for the 1927 musical play Mahagonny-Songspiel. The song was finally included in their 1930 opera Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny (Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny). It is sung in Act I by alcoholic prostitutes, they are craving first for a ‘whiskey bar,’ then for a ‘little boy’ (in the 1930’s, this designated a bottle format), and finally for a ‘little dollar:’ CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…