Fleur perdue

Raul Anguiano - La nina desnuda
Raul Anguiano – La nina desnuda (1944), gouache sur toile, cm. 68.6×50.8

Fleur effeuillée, fente dévoilée, fruit défendu, forêt sacrée, feu allumé, fenêtre rouge du désir…

Je suis là
Toute nue
Dans la rue
Sans lilas
Pour voiler
Ma vertu
Qui n’est plus
Sans péché

Précédemment publié sur Agapeta, 2016/03/21.

The First Reformer, by Nathalia Crane

Janet Weight Reed - magical hummingbird
Janet Weight Reed – magical hummingbird – from jcrhumming.wordpress.com

The fourth part of Lava Lane, and Other Poems (1925), titled Saints and Reformers, contains six poems. Three of them explicitly mock religion. “Sunday Morning” tells of God’s activities at that moment, such as “Counting the Yiddish babies” or “Waving the popcorn scepter,” and finally “God, on a Sunday morning, / Reaching the dotage stage.” In “The Making of a Saint,” a woman dies in a garret, so “The lords of the rafters were sorry— / The spider, the moth, and the mouse,” and they manage to obtain some advantages for themselves and their garret by making her a saint. In “The Edict,” an editor advises a saint on how to write his story, so that it will be widely read. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…

A Little Girl Lost, by William Blake

František Kupka - The little girl with a ball
František Kupka – The little girl with a ball (1908)

The visionary poet and painter William Blake (b. 28 November 1757, d. 12 August 1827) went largely unrecognised during his lifetime, but he is now considered a seminal figure in the history of the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. In the poem “A Little Girl Lost” published in Songs of Experience (1794), he envisages a future where children and adolescents will freely enjoy nudity and love, and the religious condemnation of these pleasures will cause indignation. He would have been dismayed to notice that 225 years after publishing that poem, things have not much progressed in the Anglo-Saxon world. CONTINUE READING / CONTINUER LA LECTURE…